Clarke’s Cosmological Argument, assignment help

I need a 1200 – 1500 word MLA Format Paper on Clarke’s Cosmological Argument for God’s existence.  I have to discuss and analyze Clarke’s argument in the paper.

The paper must include the following items below:

–  Defend a thesis and should proceed according to the following format: Thesis, Argument, Objection(s), Response(s), Conclusion

– Sources must be properly cited using MLA format.

–  Use a standard 10-12 pt. font and be double spaced.

-Introductory paragraph: overview of what you are going to do in your paper. Must include thesis for the paper. Your thesis is going to be whether you agree or disagree with the argument you look at.  For instance, if you are going to talk about Anselm’s argument and agree with it, you might say, “My thesis will be that Anselm’s argument is a good one.”  Also, it’s OK in philosophy if you actually tell your reader straight out “My thesis in this paper will be. . . .”  In philosophy, you always want to as direct and clear as possible.

-next you might want to write one or two paragraphs with a little biographical information on your philosopher.  For instance, if you are writing on Anselm, write one or two paragraphs telling your reader about who Anselm was as a person and what he did with his life.  To do this, you will have to do some research on the Internet from a reliable source.  Some good sites are these:

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: http://plato.stanford.edu/

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy: http://www.iep.utm.edu/

Note that you don’t want to do too much of this biographical information in your paper.  One or two paragraphs is enough.  More than that would be too much.

After this, then you will want to spend some time explaining to your reader the argument you will be analyzing in your paper.  For instance, if you are going to be analyzing Anselm’s Ontological Argument in your paper, then explain Anselm’s argument to your reader.  Here you want to explain the argument you are analyzing as clearly as you can.  Also, you want to explain the line of reasoning as clearly as you can in your own words.  Don’t just give your reader a long list of quotes.  That doesn’t show you really understand the argument for yourself.  It’s OK to use some quotes in your explanation of the argument, but, again, just do not do too much of this.  Overall, your goal is to explain the line of reasoning as clearly as you can in your own words.  Here you can use the readings for the course, including the reviews that I send out each week, to help you (obviously, though, you cannot just copy any explanations in these materials; again, your goal is to explain things in your own words).  Explaining the argument you are analyzing to your reader thoroughly and clearly and carefully and in your own words will take a few paragraphs.

After you explain the argument you are analyzing to your reader, restate the thesis of your essay.  For instance, if you are looking at Anselm’s essay, you might say, “Now that I have explained Anselm’s argument, now I will defend the thesis that it is a good one.” 

Then, after you restate your thesis, go on to explain to your reader your reasons for adopting that thesis.  Here you are explaining why you accept the thesis you have stated.  This is important, and it will require you to think.  You don’t want to simply say “I agree with Anselm’s argument” or “I disagree with Anselm’s argument” and just leave it at that.  You want to go on to explain why you think that this argument you are analyzing is good or bad.  To do that, really think about the assumptions and premises that undergird the argument you are looking at.  If you think the argument is bad because a certain assumption or premise that undergirds that argument is bad, then explain which assumption or premise you think is bad and why you think that assumption or premise is bad.  If you think the argument is good because the assumptions and premises that undergird the argument are good, then explain why you find the individual assumptions and premises that undergird the argument persuasive.  Again, you don’t want to simply say “I agree with Anselm’s argument” or “I disagree with Anselm’s argument.”  You want to explain why you think that this argument you are analyzing is good or bad.

After this, you want to think of some objections to your thesis and write them out and explain why someone might have these objections.  The objections you explain here will depend on your thesis.  If you are defending the argument you are considering, then think of two or three possible objections someone might have to the argument you are defending.  For instance, if you are defending Anselm’s argument, then think of two or three possible objections that someone might have to it.  By contrast, if you are attacking the argument you are considering, then think of two or three possible objections that someone might have regarding why the argument at hand is a good one.  Doing this will require you to think hard, and it will require you to consider alternative points of view to the thesis you are considering. 

Next you want to think of responses to the very objections that you just raised and then write them out and explain them.  The responses you explain here will depend again on your thesis and the point of view you are taking.  If you are defending the argument you are considering, and then just raised two or three possible objections to it, then go on and answer each of those two or three objections.  By contrast, if you are attacking the argument you are considering, and then just considered two or three objections regarding why someone might think that the argument at hand is a good one, then go on to answer those two or three objections and explain why you think they don’t show the argument at hand is good.

After this, wrap up your paper with a concluding paragraph providing an overview of what you argued in your essay.

 
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